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My essays can be found in Blackbird, The Chattahoochee Review, Consequence, CutBank, Gastronomica, Indiana Review, Iron Horse Literary Review, The Los Angeles Review, McSweeney’s, The Southeast Review, Vox, War, Literature, & the Arts, and elsewhere.

I was a finalist for the 2021 Chautauqua Janus Prize, and winner of the 2020 Indiana Review Creative Nonfiction Prize and the 2014 Crab Orchard Review Rafael Torch Nonfiction Award. I have been a writer-in-residence at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico, Newnan ArtRez, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and am a 2016 St. Botolph Emerging Artist Award winner. To aid the completion of my book, I have also received grants and scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Emerson College, and the Somerville Arts Council.

I teach at Emerson College and Harvard University, and am a workshop facilitator for Writers Without Margins—a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to literary arts for everyone, including those marginalized, stigmatized, or isolated by the challenges of addiction recovery, disability, trauma, sickness, injury, poverty, and mental illness.

I’m also an editorial consultant, and work with writers on essays and book-length projects. For the remainder of 2022, I will be on leave from consulting and teaching, working full-time on my memoir.

Three of my essays have been named Notables in The Best American Essays series. You can find me on Twitter @caitlindmcgill, or at caitlinmcgill.com.

Memoir Summary: When I was sixteen, I began dating a twenty-two-year-old: an intensely alluring, and soon abusive, drug-addled man with a tenuous tether to reality. For six years, he controlled me, and I hid the truth from my family. When They Wondered Where I Went is a Miami-based, coming-of-age memoir about escaping this tortured relationship and cult-like mind control, losing and reclaiming myself and my family, the inheritance of silence, and the human desire to believe in the unseen.

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